Archive

Tag: Relationship with God

June 7, 2018
One afternoon during last year’s Vacation Bible School.

In the summer issue of Tapestry, which will be available around the church in a couple of weeks, we asked some of our children and youth the question: How are you going to stay close to God this summer?

Instead of asking you that question, I thought I’d suggest an answer I plan to consider: By focusing on stewardship.

Not the stewardship campaign, which each fall asks us to decide on the financial commitment we’ll make to God’s work in the year ahead. I’m not even talking about fulfilling that commitment during months when we may be out of town or focused on family time—although we hope you’ll do that, too.

As important as our financial commitment to God’s work is, there is more to stewardship than pledging and giving. God also asks us to give of our time and talent.

In the summer, our routines are disrupted. We may be distracted by travel, by the pool, by summer concerts, by more family time, even by the luxury of time just to relax. I’m pretty sure those welcome distractions can make it harder to fill some of our community’s ongoing needs. God’s call to serve during the summer months could be even more urgent than usual.

Here are some ways FPC folks could answer God’s call to be good stewards this summer.

  • Picnic with Westerly Hills families on Sunday, June 10, at 3 p.m. Food will be provided and all are welcome to this opportunity for fellowship at The Core Church, 2300 Alleghany Street.
  • Give the gift of life by donating blood when the Bloodmobile is here at the church on Sunday, June 10, from 9:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. Watch this video to hear what Parish Nurse Kristin Foster and member Alex Ayer have to say about this year’s blood drive, then sign up to give from our website.
  • Deliver sandwiches to the Men’s Shelter, 3410 Statesville Avenue, by 11:30 on Sunday mornings. You are also welcome to help distribute the sandwiches and have lunch with the men. Sign up online.
  • Help out with Vacation Bible School the week of June 25-28, 9 a.m.-noon. Contact Tammy Winchip, Director of Children’s Ministry.
  • Stay strong this summer by helping out at the Loaves & Fishes Pantry. The Pantry needs of volunteers who are able to lift loaded crates, to bend and stoop as needed, and to catch loaded crates coming down the delivery chute. Contact Mary Scott Peterson to learn more.
  • Stay strong, part two, involves three hours once a month to deliver furniture for someone transitioning out of homelessness into a safe, comfortable home. This happens on the second Saturday each month, 9 a.m. until noon. Not everything is heavy, so don’t stay away because you can’t lift a sofa. This is a great service and fellowship opportunity for middle school age youth through adult. Sign up online.
  • Experience the joy of helping our BELL scholars. For six weeks, June 18–July 25, we will host 60 young scholars (rising first through third graders). They will work on reading and math skills in the mornings, then experience a wide range of field trips and enrichment activities—yoga, Lego robotics, dance and swimming—in the afternoons. Your time and talent makes this possible. Sign up here.
  • Worship needs volunteers to serve as sound board operators during the 11 a.m. worship. You’ll receive training. Contact Jesse Hite.

Those are just a few of the immediate ways you can focus on stewardship this summer. Keep your eyes on the Now@FPC page on the website, which is continuously updated with more ways to serve your community and your church.

Oh, and for those weeks when you are out of town, you can also visit the lower right of any page on the website to keep your contributions up to date through the summer. And you can attend a church where you’re vacationing, as well as watch us on TV or via live streaming on the website.

I hope you’ll join me in an unofficial time-and-talent stewardship campaign this summer. If you give this a try, let me know how it works to keep you close to God.

~ The Reverend Pen Peery

April 15, 2016

Doubt … can easily be overcome through full attention to God’s voice. And it was on the peak of the mountain in Costa Rica that I realized that I have been blessed with an amazing family and godly friends and an almighty God who is willing to stand beside me and encourage me up the hardest part of my mountain. Ann Mariah Burton

Our youth lead worship on Sunday, April 17, at 9 and 11 am, and we will celebrate our 8th-grade confirmation class at the 11 am service. Join us for worship and stay afterward for food a food truck lunch and games on the lawn! All are invited to this special day as we  give thanks to God with our youth and for our youth.

April 14, 2016

When faced with adversity, many people call into question God’s motives.  Although I don’t know why bad things happen to good people, I do know one thing: God has a plan for all of us. George Valaoras

 

On that day, I saw God when I was being taught the beautiful but very challenging art of Nepalese dance. I saw God when a resident gardener plucked his first tomato off of the vine of the plant in his box garden. I saw God when a young girl joyfully leapt onto my back from a picnic table. Stuart Ayer.

Youth Sunday, April 17. 9 am and 11 am

June 12, 2013

You shall not make for yourself an idol, whether in the form of anything that is in heaven above, or that is on the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I the LORD your God am a jealous God, punishing children for the iniquity of parents, to the third and the fourth generation of those who reject me, but showing steadfast love to the thousandth generation of those who love me and keep my commandments.
Exodus 20:4-6

While Moses was receiving the Law, a guide to what it meant to be God’s people, those very people had turned to another god.

This almost ended the deal, Scripture tells us.

To become free took God’s eyes to be fixed on the people. To remain free took the people’s eyes to be fixed on God.

June 10, 2013

The Ten Commandments tell us that God wants more from us. God wants more of us.

You shall not make for yourself an idol, whether in the form of anything that is in heaven above, or that is on the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I the LORD your God am a jealous God, punishing children for the iniquity of parents, to the third and the fourth generation of those who reject me, but showing steadfast love to the thousandth generation of those who love me and keep my commandments.
Exodus 20:4-6

Like mirrors, idols reflect and (therefore) affirm what we project. Unlike mirrors, they give those images such authority that worship is our only response. Idols are easy to worship. They stay put. They obey our instructions and affirm our agendas. They answer all of our questions with answers that we want to hear (or at least expect to hear). They ask only of us what we want to give. It is easier to worship an idol than some uncontrollable, unpredictable, demanding, even jealous God. Idols are safe. They tuck our sense of right and wrong in the warm comfort of sanctifying the way the world is, the way we are, the way we want the world to be.

This particular commandment doesn’t keep us from ourselves as much as it opens us to experience where and how this mysterious, unpredictable God is breaking in, revealing something new. It invites us to imagine not only what it means to love God but what it means to truly love one another: to offer ourselves beyond our selves, to give up control for the sake of giving into relationship, to remember who we are and whose we are.

What are some idols common in our world today? Where do they get their power? What idols do you worship, and why are they destructive to your relationship with God?