Archive

Tag: Bible study

September 7, 2019

Small groups are modeled after the practices of Jesus, who ate, studied and prayed with others. These groups meet throughout the week in homes and at the church.  Covenant Groups are specifically for young adults (ages 20-40) and meet on a schedule determined by the individual groups. Check the current issue of FirstNEWS (available to read online at the top of the Now@First page) or the News & Announcements section of the Now@First page for more current details.

 

Covenant Groups – FPC young adults (anyone 40 or younger!) are invited to be part of a small group of 8-12 people who will learn and grow together.  Groups will meet at least once a month on a mutually agreed upon schedule and will study various books.  Being part of a Covenant Group involves making an initial commitment of one semester (September-December) with the opportunity to re-up in January.  If you have any questions or would like to be part of one of these groups, contact Tanya Gaspar.

 

Bible and Beverage – Join the Reverend Pen Peery and other FPC men for discussion and fellowship to deepen the faith of and the connection among men of all ages. (Second Tuesdays, 8-9:30 p.m., usually at Resident Culture Brewing Company, 2101 Central Avenue.)

 

Tuesday Morning Bible Study – This group engages in deep, critical thinking as it seeks to know God and God’s revelation in Jesus Christ. Units include scriptural study, theology, ethics, and spirituality. Contact Garrell Keesler.  (Tuesdays, S203, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.)

 

Thursday Morning Men’s Bible Study – This group of faithful men gathers to study God’s word and build and strengthen relationships. Leadership comes from within the group, and all variety of ideas are honored and respected. New participants are always welcome. Contact Chuck Williamson. (Thursdays, Frances Browne Dining Room, 7-8 a.m.; breakfast served every second Thursday.)

 

Thursday Women’s Bible Study (ThuMBS)  – Studying various books together, this group develops a deepened connection to God and builds bonds of friendship and mutual support with one another. Led by the Reverend Katherine Kerr(Thursdays, Pattie Cole Room, 9:30-11 am)

For additional information about small groups for adults, contact Garrell Keesler, Director of Adult Formation.

 

Return to the Learn page or read more about specific Adult Formation programs:

August 29, 2018

Sunday Formation is the space between worship services to study God’s word and deepen relationships with others. Class discussions help us apply the Word to our lives. Format varies among classes. There are no age specifications for these adult classes.

Here are the classes we offer on Sunday mornings, 10-10:45 a.m. Learn more about the weekly details for each class, as well as a monthly roundup of Adult Formation classes.

Chapel Class

The Chapel class uses The Present Word curriculum to study Genesis, about the beginning of God’s activity in the world through relationships, family and divine promises. (Meets in the Chapel)

 

Passages

The Passages class presents topics that invite exploration of Scripture and ways of living the faith personally and for the world.  The lessons are attentive to the interests of those navigating mid-life passages, but the class is open to all.  This group gathers for social events at least twice a year.  (Meets in Pattie Cole, S203)

 

Conversations

The Conversations class uses a round-table setting to explore the ways we understand Scripture and apply it to our lives. This fall, the Reverend Mary Margaret Porter leads a series on Ten Prayers that Changed the World to illustrate the ways God was, and is, active in our lives. (Meets in Frances Browne Dining Room, P212)

 

The Good Samaritan Class

The Good Samaritan Class considers events in our world and discusses how people of faith respond and live. (Fresco Lobby)

 

Fellowship Group

Fellowship Group is a welcoming table for all to build community through connecting with others.  It is minimally structured and open to all. (Meets in Wood Fellowship Hall)

 

Return to the Learn page or read more about specific Adult Formation programs:

 

 

February 6, 2018

Join the Reverend Pen Peery and other FPC men for this new opportunity for discussion and fellowship on Tuesday, February 13, at Duckworth’s Taphouse on Park Road (4435 Park Road), 8-9:30 p.m. <RSVP to Pen> (ppeery@firstpres-charlotte.org) if possible, but don’t stay away if it’s a last-minute decision.

January 29, 2018

Garrell Keesler will lead Lessons From the Wilderness: The Book of Numbers on Tuesdays, February 13-March 27. “The wilderness was where the Israelites found themselves suspended between a past they could no longer return to and a future the did not yet have the courage to embrace.  It was there, in the barren no-man’s-land of the desert, that the nation found itself alone with God….”

Join the discussion using Jonathan Sacks’ book Numbers: The Wilderness Years, in the Pattie Cole Room (S203), 11:45a.m.-1 p.m. Newcomers are invited. Contact Garrell Keesler for more information.

August 15, 2013

Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have come not to abolish but to fulfill. For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth pass away, not one letter, not one stroke of a letter, will pass from the law until all is accomplished.

As Christians – and those who stand in the Reformed tradition – we have always had a bit of a struggle between the law and the gospel.  

If you need evidence of this tension, read one of Paul’s letters to any number of his churches – in Rome, Galatia, or Corinth.  For disciples of Jesus, salvation does not come from an adherence to the law but by the grace and glory of the cross.  

However, Jesus still has a high regard for the place of the law in the lives of those who are his disciples.  What are we to do with this apparent conundrum?  

John Calvin is of help here.  Calvin – one of the forefathers in our Reformed tradition – described three uses for the law for those whose identity and salvation are secured by the grace of Jesus Christ.

The first use of the law is to convict us of our sin.  Knowing the law – even if we cannot perfectly keep the law – reminds us of the fact that, as humans, we fall short.  It also reminds us of the utter dependence we have on God’s grace. 

The second use of the law is to restrain our passion.  God’s law, again, even if we cannot fully abide by it, curtails our tendency toward behavior that is driven purely by our desire for pleasure.  In this way, the law functions the way that civil law does in our society – it sets boundaries for our behavior that create order.

 Calvin’s third use of the law is to show us how to live.  Here is the connection to grace.  It is when we understand ourselves as redeemed by God’s grace that we are motivated – not out of fear, but out of gratitude – to walk in paths of righteousness.