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Christian Formation

August 1, 2016

Montreat Youth Conference 3Our final day at Montreat was bittersweet.

The week concluded with a powerful charge to be the change we wish to see in the world. It began at keynote where we were reminded that when we stand together, as a community, we can overpower evil in the world. The keynote leaders exhibited that ordinary, small actions can have incredible ripple effects on the world. This notion was carried over in to small group discussion, prompting many groups into deep personal conversations.

It was sad to say goodbye to all of our friends made throughout the week in small groups, but we remain excited about newly formed relationships.

During the afternoon the seriousness was put aside for a moment while we played our 2nd Annual First Presbyterian Montreat Tennis Tournament. We enjoyed beautiful weather and friendly competition (Alex Glontz was crowned champion).

Lastly, it was time for the candlelight worship service. The service was characterized by a moving final sermon, calling each of us to action. All 1000 of us then gathered around Lake Susan to light candles and sing songs in remembrance of an unbelievable week. First Presbyterian said an emotional goodbye to seven graduated seniors (George Valaoras, Stuart Ayer, Amelia Keesler, Ann Mariah Burton, Alex Glontz, Jackson Proctor, & Harrison Ferone). It capped off an amazing and powerful week.

Until next time… Montreat blog signing off.

-FPC Montreat Youth Group

July 29, 2016

Montreat Youth Conference Lookout MtnOur beautiful Thursday morning started out with keynote in Anderson auditorium. Erika and Laura reflected upon the story of Peter and Jesus and changing perspective. A fellow Montreat attendee, Gavin, shared a powerful testimony of his faith.

After morning small group and a delicious lunch of homemade grilled cheeses by Rob Grier, we all attended afternoon small groups to discuss further about the story of Jesus and Peter. After small group, our group hiked to the peak of Lookout Mountain and experienced amazing views and bonded over our perspectives atop the mountain.

In worship, Billy addressed the importance of having a variety of types of friends and being a listening ear in times of need. We are all looking forward to another great day tomorrow and to the conclusion of our time here in Montreat.

– Ann Mariah Burton, Kimberly Morgan, Alexanne O’dell,

                                                                       Jack Mallory, Alex Ayer, Anna Catherine Pandos

July 28, 2016

Montreat Youth Conference 2Today’s main topic for keynote this morning was Pentecost. We talked about incorporating language and opening our eyes to our church and its importance. We also discussed how the Holy Spirit brings us together under one tongue. After small group, we had our free afternoon in Asheville.

Worship tonight moved us as it discussed using our voice and action to praise God, despite how small we may seem in our world. One of our favorite points today was when Billy said he talked at a church where women aren’t allowed to speak on the stage like the men.  He didn’t think this was fair and he said that he was going to talk below the stage “with his sisters.” Today we also gained an appreciation of our world lens, as stories from small group showed how important your community from childhood is in building the foundations of faith.

– Caroline Dittner, Jackson Proctor, Alex Glontz, Abigail Justis and Grace Guinan

Youth at Montreat 2016Our second day in Montreat proved to be even better than the first. Throughout keynote, small groups, and worship we discussed the importance of family. The keynote speakers challenged us to think about how we can define ourselves uniquely while still keeping our family close to us. At the end of the service, two First Presbyterian Youth (Elizabeth Pandos & Ann Mariah Burton) performed a contemporary dance to further elucidate this message.

Discussions continued in small group in which we could intimately share our own experiences and struggles. This naturally promoted deeper conversation and by the end of the day everyone reported positive small group experiences. The day concluded with Billy leading an awesome, thought-provoking worship service. He shared stories from his past, including the murder of his father, but assured us that we can still write our own stories. In his typical charismatic fashion he dared us to be the best version of ourselves. In his words, “Nobody can beat you at being you!” To which Anderson Auditorium responded with a resounding “Amen!”  It was an amazing day and we cannot wait for tomorrow.

– Harrison Ferone, Davy Rayner, Margaret Lloyd, Elizabeth Pandos, Caroline Keesler

July 26, 2016

Montreat Youth Conference 1We woke this morning to an amazing breakfast provided by our parents. During Keynote we did energizers and sang songs.

We then listened to our very own Erika Funk and Laura Becker preach about a world of difference. The congregation was encouraged to be aware of the lenses through which we view the world. Erika included a personal story about her experiences growing up with her mom, who worked for a nonprofit organization that followed up on police complaints. The story taught us the importance of being aware of our biases that result from our experiences.

After keynote we went to our first small group and each of us enjoyed the experience and playing games and learning new names. Post small group we feasted and played foosball.  After lunch we went to small group again but unfortunately the afternoon rec event was rained out. Later we came home and spent some quality time together until dinner was ready. After much suspense, all of the BBQ was gone in a matter of minutes. With full bellies we listened to Billy enthusiastically preach about the Tower of Babel and the similarities we all share to the people who God separated. The major take-away was that diversity is important and that God wants us to appreciate different than us. Looking forward to another day!

– Stuart Ayer, Elizabeth Rayner, Paxton Williamson, Cole Mallory and Anne Carlton

June 1, 2016

pen_newIn May, I attended the first two sessions in a learning series, “United by Faith, Divided by Race,” hosted by First Presbyterian Church and one of our neighbor churches, First United Presbyterian Church, a historically African-American congregation.

I’ve been the pastor of First Presbyterian for about four years and knew my congregation has shared history with First United Presbyterian. The predecessor congregation to First United dates back to 1866 – a date that is not lost on someone who was born in the South and has relatives who served in the Confederate Army.

In May, however, I was confronted by the details that I had previously not known of the relationship between First Presbyterian and First United Presbyterian.

For years, leading up to 1866, African-Americans worshipped at First Presbyterian. Many of those African-Americans were slaves; some were free. They were baptized at our baptismal font. They attended Sunday school classes – which was against the mandate of the Presbyterian Church at the time, because those classes about the Bible also served to teach literacy to African-American children who had little other access to education. But they were always “they.”  African-Americans were not allowed to sit in the main floor of the sanctuary. They were not allowed to be officers of the church.

Eventually, the African-American group within First Presbyterian’s congregation developed a worshipping community who were told they could meet – not on Sunday – but on Monday. And they could meet not in the sanctuary, but in the basement.

Sometime during the Civil War, the Session of First Presbyterian Church voted to expel this worshipping community from the premises. After this vote, a few leaders in the African-American community met with the pastor of First Presbyterian to help them charter three new congregations: the Colored Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn Presbyterian Church, and Seventh Street Presbyterian Church. In the middle of the last century, this constellation of churches became First United Presbyterian Church.

History is a funny thing. It’s rich. It’s complicated. It’s messy. And sometimes there are parts of it that we wish we could forget. When I heard about this part of my church’s history it made me queasy. I wish that the Session of First Presbyterian Church hadn’t taken that vote, a vote that clearly violates the commandment Jesus gave us: “to love the Lord your God and your neighbor as yourself.” But I also know that that Session was a product of its time. In the mid-1800s a number of both Elders and Ministers at First Presbyterian Church owned slaves.

As a person with Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson in my family tree, I wonder how I would have voted if I were around that table at the Session meeting?

Being confronted by a history in which you did not participate doesn’t change the fact that history shapes the reality of the world in which you do participate. That’s the place where I so often get stuck. So in our class, it was helpful when our teacher, Dr. Julia Robinson – a history professor at UNCC and an ordained minister – encouraged us with these words: “when you know this kind of history, it is easy to allow yourself to get swallowed up in either guilt (if you are white) or anger (if you are black). Instead, as people of faith, these are the moments when we need to turn to Jesus.”

Indeed.

I want Jesus to walk with me…with us, actually…as First Presbyterian and First United Presbyterian continue to grapple with what our shared history means for our shared future.

– Pen Peery

(The final two sessions of “United by Faith, Divided by Race,” will be on Sundays, June 5 and 12, at 12:15 p.m. Details here.)

May 17, 2016

Any mother-daughter or mother-son relationship can be complicated, said Dr. Julia Robinson, opening speaker for the United by Faith, Divided by Race discussion series between members at First Presbyterian Church and First United Presbyterian Church.

“And the Mother Church of the black protestant church is the white church,” she said to the 70-plus members of both congregations who gathered for the first session. “Some people like to say it’s the sister church but, no, First Presbyterian is the white mother church.”

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Dr. Julia Robinson discusses the historical relationship of First Presbyterian and First United Presbyterian churches of Charlotte.

Dr. Robinson, a teaching elder of the Charlotte Presbytery and an associate professor of African American Religions and Religious Diaspora at UNCC, pointed out the theological contradictions that allowed founders and early leaders of FPC to own slaves at the same time they taught those slaves about Christianity. Although they understood the fundamental principle found in Galatians 3:28 (“There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus.”), they also believed there was strong Biblical justification for slavery in Leviticus 24:44-46, 1 Timothy 6:1-2, Ephesians 6:5-8, Colossians 4:1 and 1 Peter 2:18-21.

Most notably, Genesis 9:25 (“he said, ‘Cursed be Canaan; a slave of slaves shall he be to his brothers.”), known as the “curse of Ham,” was used to justify the belief that descendants of Ham—including all Africans—had been consigned to perpetual slavery.

“Africans were believed to be ‘called’ to slavery,” Dr. Robinson said.

Dr. Robinson outlined her research into the early years of FPC and its contradictory treatment of the black people in its midst. Although it was against the law to teach slaves to read, FPC taught the ABCs along with Bible study, typically offered on Mondays. While many in those days considered Africans to be less than human, slaves and their children were nevertheless baptized, indicating a belief that they also possessed an immortal soul.

After slaves were freed, those who had been affiliated with FPC wanted to remain Presbyterian because of polity and structure. They also wanted the freedom to worship on Sunday, leading to the founding 150 years ago of what became, through a series of name changes and a merger with Brooklyn Presbyterian Church (founded in 1911), what we now know as First United Presbyterian Church.

“Racism has operated as a smoke screen to take the focus off Jesus,” Dr. Robinson said. “If we are to heal the rifts of the past we cannot do it with made-up minds or with programs like this. We have to do it with the focus on Jesus Christ to knit us back together.”

Being knit back together, she said, does not mean we must all be part of the same church. But we must recognize how our history has divided the body of Christ and have the intentional discussions that will allow Jesus to overcome our past and heal the disease of conscious and unconscious racism from our respective congregations.

“There will always be a remnant that wants the status quo,” Dr. Robinson concluded. “There will always be pockets of racism that both churches will still operate in. But there’s a remnant that wants to heal. And God loves working with remnants.”

Next Week: Reaching Across the Table

On Sunday, May 22, all are invited to join in a conversation at First United Presbyterian Church, 201 E 7th Street, from 12:15-1:30 p.m. Lunch is available for $5.00. Dr. Julia Robinson will conclude with a brief history of what happened to and between our two churches in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

To prepare for the conversation that will follow her talk, Dr. Robinson suggests reading 1 Corinthians 13:1-3, Luke 12:12, Philippians 2:13 and 2 Corinthians 13:9. She also suggests reflecting on how the following words from the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. apply to our churches today: “The first way that the church can repent, the first way that it can move out into the arena of social reform is to remove the yoke of segregation from its own body.”

April 15, 2016

Doubt … can easily be overcome through full attention to God’s voice. And it was on the peak of the mountain in Costa Rica that I realized that I have been blessed with an amazing family and godly friends and an almighty God who is willing to stand beside me and encourage me up the hardest part of my mountain. Ann Mariah Burton

Our youth lead worship on Sunday, April 17, at 9 and 11 am, and we will celebrate our 8th-grade confirmation class at the 11 am service. Join us for worship and stay afterward for food a food truck lunch and games on the lawn! All are invited to this special day as we  give thanks to God with our youth and for our youth.

April 14, 2016

When faced with adversity, many people call into question God’s motives.  Although I don’t know why bad things happen to good people, I do know one thing: God has a plan for all of us. George Valaoras

 

On that day, I saw God when I was being taught the beautiful but very challenging art of Nepalese dance. I saw God when a resident gardener plucked his first tomato off of the vine of the plant in his box garden. I saw God when a young girl joyfully leapt onto my back from a picnic table. Stuart Ayer.

Youth Sunday, April 17. 9 am and 11 am