Category

Christian Formation

March 29, 2019

Join us Sunday, April 28, as our FPC youth lead 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. worship services. We will celebrate confirmands during worship at 11 a.m. There will be no PYC that evening.

Join us this summer for To Mars & Beyond, a Vacation Bible School experience where we will help kids discover the wonders of God’s universe. Exploring where God’s power can take them, they will become voyagers on a journey through space.
Dates and times are June 24- 27 from 9:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Registration is open to children who will be five years old by June 1 through fifth grade. Cost is $20 per child. We don’t want anyone to miss VBS due to financial concerns, so please check the box for a confidential scholarship request when registering.

Childcare and preschool options are available for volunteers.

January 17, 2019

One more training session for those who work with children and youth is scheduled for Tuesday, February 5, at 8 a.m. in the chapel.

 

If you are a new volunteer or staff member, or if it is time for you to update your training, mark your calendars for one of these sessions.

December 28, 2018

The Reverend Mary Margaret Porter will lead this class on the Apocrypha, a large body of writings about the Bible and Jesus that cannot be found in the books in our pews or on our bookshelves. Many of these writings tell ancient stories about Jesus as a child and the beginnings of Christianity. Some may have been written by and about powerful women of the time.

In this series, learn why some books appear in the Bible and others do not, who decided what to include and what to leave out, how we know about these other writings and what we should think of them.

Classes will be at 10 a.m., during the Formation hour, in the Pattie Cole Room (S203). The final three classes will be:

  • February 3 – The Ministry Gospels
  • February 10 – The Passion Gospels
  • February 17 – The Post-Resurrection Discourse Gospels
September 7, 2018

The final program for this fall’s Opportunity Forum is Wednesday, October 24, when we will hear from a panel from Communities in Schools. The focus for this series is on raising awareness and empowering action for change through first-hand stories of how inequity and racial discrimination affect students in our school system.

Dinner is available for $8 cash or check beginning at 5:15 p.m. The program is in Wood Fellowship Hall, 6-7:30 p.m.

Register for childcare for Wednesday, October 24.

 

 

Small groups are modeled after the practices of Jesus, who ate, studied and prayed with others. These groups meet throughout the week in homes and at the church.  Covenant Groups are specifically for young adults (ages 20-40) and meet on a schedule determined by the individual groups. Check the current issue of FirstNEWS (available to read online at the top of the Now@First page) or the News & Announcements section of the Now@First page for more current details.

 

Covenant Groups – FPC young adults (anyone 40 or younger!) are invited to be part of a small group of 8-12 people who will learn and grow together.  Groups will meet at least once a month on a mutually agreed upon schedule and will study various books.  Being part of a Covenant Group involves making an initial commitment of one semester (September-December) with the opportunity to re-up in January.  If you have any questions or would like to be part of one of these groups, contact Tanya Gaspar.

 

Bible and Beverage – Join the Reverend Pen Peery and other FPC men for discussion and fellowship to deepen the faith of and the connection among men of all ages. (Second Tuesdays, 8-9:30 p.m., usually at Resident Culture Brewing Company, 2101 Central Avenue.)

 

Tuesday Morning Bible Study – This group engages in deep, critical thinking as it seeks to know God and God’s revelation in Jesus Christ. Units include scriptural study, theology, ethics, and spirituality. Contact Garrell Keesler.  (Tuesdays, S203, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.)

 

Thursday Morning Men’s Bible Study – This group of faithful men gathers to study God’s word and build and strengthen relationships. Leadership comes from within the group, and all variety of ideas are honored and respected. New participants are always welcome. Contact Chuck Williamson. (Thursdays, Frances Browne Dining Room, 7-8 a.m.; breakfast served every second Thursday.)

 

Thursday Women’s Bible Study (ThuMBS)  – Studying various books together, this group develops a deepened connection to God and builds bonds of friendship and mutual support with one another. Led by the Reverend Katherine Kerr(Thursdays, Pattie Cole Room, 9:30-11 am)

For additional information about small groups for adults, contact Garrell Keesler, Director of Adult Formation.

 

Return to the Learn page or read more about specific Adult Formation programs:

August 29, 2018

Sunday Formation is the space between worship services to study God’s word and deepen relationships with others. Class discussions help us apply the Word to our lives. Format varies among classes. There are no age specifications for these adult classes.

Here are the classes we offer on Sunday mornings, 10-10:45 a.m. Learn more about the weekly details for each class, as well as a monthly roundup of Adult Formation classes.

Chapel Class

The Chapel class uses The Present Word curriculum to study Genesis, about the beginning of God’s activity in the world through relationships, family and divine promises. (Meets in the Chapel)

 

Passages

The Passages class presents topics that invite exploration of Scripture and ways of living the faith personally and for the world.  The lessons are attentive to the interests of those navigating mid-life passages, but the class is open to all.  This group gathers for social events at least twice a year.  (Meets in Pattie Cole, S203)

 

Conversations

The Conversations class uses a round-table setting to explore the ways we understand Scripture and apply it to our lives. This fall, the Reverend Mary Margaret Porter leads a series on Ten Prayers that Changed the World to illustrate the ways God was, and is, active in our lives. (Meets in Frances Browne Dining Room, P212)

 

The Good Samaritan Class

The Good Samaritan Class considers events in our world and discusses how people of faith respond and live. (Fresco Lobby)

 

Fellowship Group

Fellowship Group is a welcoming table for all to build community through connecting with others.  It is minimally structured and open to all. (Meets in Wood Fellowship Hall)

 

Return to the Learn page or read more about specific Adult Formation programs:

 

 

June 1, 2017

When I was little, some of my favorite books were from the Mr. Men Little Miss series. My oldest cousin had given me his collection along with the set of cassette tapes, so I could listen to the stories even if I couldn’t read them yet. I would set myself up in my playroom with a stack of books and my bright red Fisher Price tape player, and I’d get lost in the stories of Mr. Messy and Little Miss Trouble.

I still love stories. If you were to come to my home, you’d see bookshelves in almost every room, and a stack of books almost as tall as the lamp on my nightstand.

Stories can move us beyond ourselves and give us a different perspective on the world. They help us to know ourselves better and to understand others more fully.

As Christians, we are story people. We read stories of Scripture to learn more about who God is and who we are in relationship to God. Jesus himself told stories to help his followers understand more about God and what God hopes for God’s people.

The centrality and poignancy of stories were two of the reasons why we chose “The Stories We Tell” to be our Formation theme this year. Over the course of the past nine months, we’ve shared a lot of stories with each other. FPC friends of all ages have listened to God’s story in Scripture together. We’ve shared our life stories with each other at Bible studies and grade level dinners. We’ve seen how God is writing a larger story for First Presbyterian Church in uptown Charlotte that began long before we were born and will continue after us.

As we wrap up this formation year, we are grateful for the ways you’ve shared your stories with each other, and we’re looking forward to seeing what’s in God’s next chapter for FPC.

~ The Reverend Katelyn Gordon

(Please view some of the art that has been created as part of telling our stories over the past nine months, and scroll down to read what a few of our members believe about the importance of telling our stories.)

 

The bowl is made of strips of paper with words about baptism and belonging written by First Church children, 2017 Confirmands and FPC staff.

Why is it important to tell stories?

This book was created by FPC Congregational Retreat participants in October 2016. Participants designed a page based on their favorite Bible story to be included in the book.

“Because God is in them!” – Fox Staub, age 4

“Stories let us know about the Bible and what Jesus did for us.” – Avayanna Simpson, age 8

“Stories help us worship and remember what Jesus did.” – Jane Young, age 7

The chalice was made by member Frances Furr; Youth intern Callie Malone added the words selected by FPC Officers at the 2017 Officer Retreat. The officers were asked to respond to the question, “Who or what has helped you to know you belong in this community?”

“Telling stories is so important for in doing so we can let people into our lives and cast light on the seemingly inexplicable feelings and emotions we experience. When we seek to share events in our life—either light-hearted or vulnerable—we foster community, and a topic that we once felt alone in becomes one that is relatable. For me, stories are a space where people can bare themselves, be vulnerable, and find solace within the group of people who receive those words and find meaning in them.” – Grace Burud, age 18

“Stories are important. We need to tell them so that we pass them down from generation to generation. If we don’t tell them then people won’t ever hear them!” – Elijah Johnson, age 12

“Stories link us together. We learn about commonalities between ourselves and others to build relationship, and can understand the experience of those around us more fully when we share our stories.” – Katherine Stewart, FPC middle school youth advisor

“Because we forget so much. We forget the goodness of God, the beauty of life, and the many blessings we receive simply from being alive. We also forget or exaggerate our suffering and pain, and stories remind us of where we’ve been and how far we’ve come. Stories connect us to each other, to ourselves, and also, perhaps most of all, to God. Who is a better, more unpredictable, more creative story teller than God? God’s stories are planted in our hearts, watered and fed by the stories we hear and the stories we read in Scripture. They then grow to become the stories God writes in us and in our lives. If we are paying attention, we will notice that God writes such good stories that we have to tell them; we have to share them. We simply cannot keep them to ourselves.” – Gail Henderson-Belsito, FPC elder

 

 

December 20, 2016

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August 31, 2016
Kyle Chandler as Coach Eric Taylor

I’m totally hooked on the TV show Friday Night Lights. Yes, I know the show has actually been off the air since 2011; I tend not to catch on to the good stuff until it’s released in box set. Thanks to the convenience of Netflix, I don’t have to wait a week to watch the next episode, so I’ve been watching an episode or two almost every night for the past few weeks.

It’s gotten to the point (the sad point?) where I think of the characters on the show as real people.  I find myself seeking out friends who’ve watched the show and saying things like, “Don’t you just love Matt Saracen?” Or “Buddy Garrity drives me crazy,” and “I can’t believe Lila did that!”  Events in everyday life make me think of something that happened two episodes ago, and I wonder WWCTD (What Would Coach Taylor Do?).  I bring up Friday Night Lights in conversation and encourage people who haven’t seen it to start watching it.

I’m now in the last season of the show, and I’m trying to slow myself down so I don’t get to the finale too soon.  I’m not ready for it to be over.As silly as it may seem to feel so strongly about a TV show and its characters, I’m guessing I’m not the only one.  Maybe for you it’s West Wing, Friends, LOST, Breaking Bad, or The Good Wife.  (If you’re a fellow Friday Night Lights groupie, let me know!)  Our love for these shows and their characters is a testament to the power of stories.  A good story captures our attention and sticks with us even when it’s over.  A good story can challenge us and inspire us to make a change in our lives, to work to heal a relationship, to try again.

This understanding of the power of stories is what’s behind “The Stories We Tell,” our formation theme this year.  As Christians, we learn and study the stories of the Bible, trusting that they help us better understand who we are and who God is.  We share our own stories – stories of success and loss, stories of defining moments in our lives and of mundane daily routines – and we listen to the stories of others.

The more I think about it, the more I think that story may be one of the greatest gifts we share with each other as the church.  This community is one where we practice being honest about our own stories and where we open ourselves to being transformed by the stories of Scripture and our neighbors.

As we begin this new program year at FPC, I hope you’ll find a place to connect with the story of our church and our ministries and a place to share your own story.  Personally, I can’t wait to see what happens next in the story God is telling through the people of First Presbyterian.

– Katelyn Gordon